Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman

Here are animated crows, a criminal monkey, an ice man, as well as the dreams that shape us and the things we wish for. Whether during a chance reunion in Italy, a romantic exile in Greece, a holiday in Hawaii or in the grip of everyday life, Murakami’s characters confront loss, or sexuality, or the glow of a firefly, or the impossible distance between those who ought to be closest of all.

Reviews

More insights into life, death, memories, love and kangaroos that one has a right to expect in any single volume

- Daily Express

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An intimate pleasure

- The Times

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Literature's answer to David Lynch

- Times Literary Supplement

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These stories are rich in Murakami magic... a collection that all readers will enjoy

- Independent

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Sharp but humane observation...as unforgettable as it is untypical

- New Statesman

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Although Murakami's style and deadpan humour are wonderfully distinctive, his emotional territory is more familiar - remorse, unresolved confusion, sudden epiphanies - though heightened by the surreal... For all its peculiarity, Planet Murakami offers a recognisable landscape of our fears

- Observer

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Disarming, amusing and reveals his lightness of touch

- Scotland on Sunday

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A beguiling collection that shows off Murakami's bold inventiveness and deep compassion

- Metro

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Murakami is excellent at creating an intense mood in a swift few lines... always provocative and never less than engaging

- Daily Telegraph

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By turns disturbing and delightful, funny strange and funny ha-ha...Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman is a handsome volume of prose, every bit as substantial as a novel...They show him at his very best; not as a cult novelist but as a really first-rate writer of short fiction

- Guardian

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Funny but also sad and wise

- Sunday Telegraph

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Murakami?s fictional world is extraordinary.

- The Sunday Times

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